While Teva‘s Ember Moc is technically a moccasin, we think it’s the greatest camping slipper ever invented.

Camping has two sides: on one hand is the early morning racing the sun up to a 14’er summit, and on the other hand is the all-too-real sentiment, “I just want to relax in nature.”

There are plenty of boots to take you from basecamp to summit, but few companies have paid due attention to camping lounge shoes. Sure, I can wear sandals or crocs if I’m trying to relax, but beyond that there isn’t much in terms of comfort.

That’s why when we saw Teva’s Ember Moc, we knew: it’s the perfect camping relaxation slipper.

The cool thing about these slippers is, even though my grandma would wear them, so would I. And I think we’d both rock them in our own unique way. Siri, set a reminder to get Grandma a pair of these before next Thanksgiving.

The Ember Moc is essentially a puffy jacket for your feet, with one crucial addition: a firm footbed. Comfort has never been so versatile. With a soft back, you can wear the shoe as a slipper for those moments when you only need to wear the shoes from here to there. Or you can wear it as a proper shoe from your doorstep to your tent flap.

Step in and be transported to a world of comfort.

Teva describes the Ember Moc as “a packable and casual shoe catered to a fast-paced yet adventurous soul.” I’ve been calling myself a fast-paced yet adventerous soul for years…. It’s almost like Teva read my journal, and then made a shoe just for me. And you too, I guess.

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Ryan Fliss

Ryan Fliss

Ryan leads Growth at The Dyrt. With over 10 years writing and digital community building experience, and even more experience in the outdoors, he is excited about The Dyrt's early growth and trajectory. Ryan, like most people, is an onion (figuratively speaking), and finds byline bios reductive, though useful. He is writing this himself in the third person, and--to him--it feels strange.